Who owns the content you contribute as a citizen journalist?

Not always you, it seems. CNN iReport, while being one of the best sites in terms of the user-generated content it publishes, also has some of the least favourable terms and conditions for those who submit their work to it. Look at this excerpt:

By submitting your material, for good and valuable consideration, the sufficiency and receipt of which you hereby acknowledge, you hereby grant to CNN and its affiliates a non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide license to edit, telecast, rerun, reproduce, use, create derivative works from, syndicate, license, print, sublicense, distribute and otherwise exhibit the materials you submit, or any portion thereof in any manner and in any medium or forum, whether now known or hereafter devised, without payment to you or any third party.”

If they sell content to other outlets, you will get a slice of the dough, but only a slice. Otherwise, you won’t see a bean, even if video footage you shot runs as headline news.

The other major citizen journalism hub, Demotix, has a far fairer remit. They say:

“Upload your news stories, images and video to Demotix, and we’ll broker your work to over 200 media buyers around the world”

This could go for anything between $50 and $3,000 for non-exclusive content, and for hundreds of thousands for exclusive content, they claim. Win.

So the moral is, if you’re a citizen journalist, be careful where you submit your content. CNN might have great cache, but your wallet will be no fatter at the end of a hard day’s reporting.

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‘If people knew about Twitter, there’d be no need for newspapers’ – UCL protest online guru, Jess Riches.

By Alex Webb

Twenty-year-old Jessica Riches is the voice behind @ucloccupation, the Twitter account which served as the voice for students occupying the University College London campus in protest at the surge in student fees. The account garnered more than 5,000 followers, and the second-year English student has since been hailed by the Guardian as a “Twitter guru” and addressed conferences on how to use Twitter.

Jessica Riches

In this interview, she explains how she fell into the role, how Twitter was used to report events first-hand and what role it can play in influencing opinion. She also recalls how she nearly had a breakdown when, mid-occupation, the main account was hacked by opponents and prank messages were posted.

Did you start with any sort of strategy?

Did you feel a lot of pressure? (Jess tells how a mistake she made led to the decision of the NUS President Aaron Porter to resign)

What sort of influence does Twitter have?

How much more reliable actually is Twitter as a primary news source?

Read the rest of this entry »

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How to fact check user generated content

By Patrick Smith

Rachel Sterne, founder and CEO of GroundReport.com, and Robert Mackey, blogger for The New York Times’ Lede Blog, discuss how they determine the credibility of news reports contributed online by unknown or anonymous users.

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Help fund citizen journalism in Libya

By Patrick Smith

American journalist Rachel Anderson is looking to equip libyan youth with the tools  they need to become more effective citizen journalists. She was embedded with Libyan youth throughout Febrary and March and now needs to raise $30,000 to train classes of 15 young people essential reporting skills and how to share their stories with the world through the web.

She is working alongside Small World News, a group specialised in training citizen journalists, who say their project in Libya aims to help people to “report on the revolution around them. The group functions as a make-shift newsroom, responsible for finding, filming and editing original stories. The goal is to create a self-sustaining citizen journalist movement that continues reporting after Anderson and other Western journalists leave Libya.”

If you would like to contribute to the cloud-funded project click here.

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A window on Africa

By Patrick Smith

In vast countries like Nigeria the mainstream press doesn’t always have the kind of penetration into all areas that one might want. With government propaganda added into the mix, it’s often hard to get a picture of what is going on across the country. Citizen journalism can play an important role in plugging this gap. Shutterfeeds aims to do just that.

This is Nigeria’s first user generated photo agency. Covering everything from politics to fashion it has something to offer everyone. People in villages largely cut off from life in the rest of Nigeria are able to tell their stories though that most accessible medium, the photo.

With corruption and propaganda still a big problem in Nigeria Shutterfeeds aims to “decipher what is propaganda and what is not, providing alternative individualistic news sources”. With elections just around the corner the fledgling agency could play an important role in exposing any cases of violence or vote rigging that might arise.

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Where people comment on news sites

By Alex Webb

Following the survey I launched yesterday, here is a bubble diagram of where people last commented on news. Most people who took part were journalism students and the sample was small, but it gives an interesting snapshop of how people comment online. I asked participants where they had commented on a news story in the past six months, if at all.
The websites where people comment

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Flipping exciting: the iPad Twitter magazine

By Alex Webb

I haven’t got an iPad, but, like any self-respecting Apple fan, I want one. Sorry – “I want never gets” – I would like one.

One of the reasons is this, Flipboard. It’s an app which draws all the articles, webpages and photos your friends link to on Facebook and Twitter, then automatically compiles them into an iPad-style magazine.

Obviously the downside of not having an iPad yet is that I haven’t been able to get to grips with the app first-hand. Nonetheless, some of its implications could be pretty interesting. It seems clear that it will make those who have it far more selective in whom they follow on Twitter – they will not want their Flipboard to be filled with the dross that some friends post. I do not imagine that every Twitter user will have Flipboard, but for those that do, there will surely be a polarisation of interest groups: there is no point in clogging up your Flipboard with fields in which you’re not interested, after all.

It is a pertinent paradigm of where journalism might head: a combination of the user-generated and professional journalism, crystallising what Twitter already does.

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